Paddy the Newfoundland checks out the statue of Robert Louis Stevenson. Picture: Greg Macvea for The Scotsman

Paddy the Newfoundland checks out the statue of Robert Louis Stevenson. Picture: Greg Macvea for The Scotsman

A century-long campaign to have Edinburgh-born Robert Louis Stevenson properly recognised has finally been realised. Almost 300 local people and Stevenson enthusiasts turned out for street party to celebrate the completion of a commemorative statue, created by Midlothian-based sculptor Allan Herriot, depicting the author as a book-loving youngster with his Skye terrier ‘Cuillin’. The bronze statue includes an inscription, taken from his essay collection, Memories and Portraits, which reads: “All through my boyhood and youth, I was known and pointed out for the pattern of an idler; and yet I was always busy on my own private end, which was to learn to write. I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in.”

Crime writer Ian Rankin, a life-long fan of Stevenson, unveiled the bronze sculpture in Colinton Parish Church garden, where the young Stevenson regularly headed to visit his grandfather, a church minister there.

The statue, costing £34,000 raised mostly from the local community, is the first phase of a public art project undertaken by the Colinton Community Conservation Trust. The statue is part of a wider public art project, expected to cost at least £150,000, which will include a Stevenson trail right through the historic village and illustrated panels featuring some of his work.

Read the full story at The Scotsman.

 

About The Author

Olga Hughes is currently pre-occupied with fairy tales, fantasy, misanthropy, medieval history and the long eighteenth century. She has a Bachelor of Fine Art from the Victorian College of the Arts and is currently majoring in Literature and History at Deakin. She has contributed to websites such as History behind Game of Thrones, The Anne Boleyn Files and The Tudor Society.

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